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Treitschkes History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century Volume 1 Heinrich Von Treitschke

Treitschkes History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century Volume 1

Heinrich Von Treitschke

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230403120
Paperback
306 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...intelligence, and he wasMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...intelligence, and he was a master of historical judgment- but he was perhaps too critical and too cautious to grasp, as did Gneisenau, the fortune of battle at the propitious moment- yet he was far from being simply a man of books, for he was a practical and valiant soldier, looking with wide-open eyes upon the tumult of life. He had just returned with Prince Augustus from duress as a prisoner of war. Miile he was in France, his love for the youthful candour and freshness of the Teutons had risen to the point of enthusiasm. He returned home with the conviction that the French were still in essentials as unmilitary a people as they had been formerly in the days of the wars of the Huguenots when they trembled before the German infantry and cavalry. How can the primitive character of nations alter in ten years? How could those who had been conquered one hundred times permanently control Germany mighty in arms? It was with the aid of such forces as these that the king undertook the work of reconstruction. The whole army was formed anew. Six brigades, two Silesian, two Old Prussian, one from Pomerania, and one from the Mark, were all that still remained of the Frederician army, and constituted the last anchor for German hopes. The troops were given more practical weapons and clothing, the pigtail was done away with, the arts of the parade-ground passed into abeyance, and their place was taken by the strenuous work of field service. All the stores had to be provided anew- Napoleons marshals had carried out their work of plunder so thoroughly that the Silesian artillery was unable for many months to undertake any practice for lack of powder. A commission of inquiry made a thorough examination of the conduct during the war of individual...